Course Descriptions

Training Descriptions

In Person Training - Foundational

Service providers often work with upset, angry, and confused clients. HSABC’s Managing Hostile Interactions workshop helps participants gain the skills necessary to work with difficult clients. Participants learn proven strategies to decrease stressful situations and increase the possibilities of working more effectively with challenging clients. Participants learn through skill-building exercises, self-reflection, and group discussion. As a participant you will: define hostility and examine its forms and dynamics, identify factors that increase potential of hostility occurring, develop skills for managing reactions to hostility, explore techniques to effectively confront and set limits on hostile behaviours, examine methods for defusing hostility, enhance personal safety in potentially violent situations, and develop strategies for effective team responding.

Instructor

Mario Govorchin is a dynamic, energetic and entertaining speaker and trainer. Much of his training work with organizations focuses on leadership, team development, change management, workplace harassment prevention, communication and conflict resolution. He is well-regarded in his work as an interventionist for organizations experiencing high internal conflict. Mario has particular strengths in individual performance and behavioural coaching and in mediating complex multi-party disputes.

Mario has significant experience working with individuals and teams in a coaching context; helping them to see and understand collective and individual behaviours and processes in new ways. He has worked with numerous organizations in a coaching capacity to support succession management, team and company performance enhancement and cohesion, and individual performance and behaviour modification.

Mario is very well-known and recognized for his comprehensive training in the areas of high anger, crisis and violence management for corporate, government and non-profit organizations. He is an acknowledged expert in the area of workplace violence prevention.

In Person Training - Foundational

Participants in this HSABC training class explore the overlap between trauma, mental health and addiction. Schizophrenia, depression and the many faces of anxiety will be covered, as well as effective strategies for engagement and interventions.  Group participants will have an opportunity to examine common barriers to services and possible solutions. This training looks through a Trauma informed lens at Mental Health and Addiction.

The Self-Care and Effective Workplace Boundaries training covers the importance and purpose of these aspects in your current role.  Some of the challenges that influence the effectiveness or appropriateness of a given boundary will be explored.  Specific boundary issues like personal disclosure, client-staff relationships, dual relationships, gift-giving/receiving, physical contact and conflicts of interest are discussed in depth.  Participants will also have an opportunity to examine their current self-care practices.  Strategies to bolster the effectiveness of their self-care routines will also be covered.
“New addition to this training as of Sept. 2019″This training now includes a segment on Workplace Bulling and Workplace Harassment. This includes harassment between Staff, Management, Clients.

Webinar- Foundational

Strong case planning skills can help front-line staff and outreach teams effectively break the cycle of entrenched homelessness by learning how to move their clients into a continuum of services. HSABC’s Introduction to Case Planning webinar is a valuable training tool that introduces the basic principles of the case planning process. The webinar explains how a front-line worker, or outreach team, can incorporate effective case planning techniques into their decision-making when working with challenging clients that seem resistant to change.

HSABC’s more advanced Case Planning II webinar teaches participants how to complete the required paperwork for BC Housing (Case Planning Forms). This webinar also reviews the purpose of each form and how best to approach completing these documents to ensure they become effective tools that drives the case planning process. The second half of HSABC’s Case Planning II webinar explores the ethics of case planning. Client autonomy, informed consent, impartiality and duty of care are ethical frameworks that are explored in this interactive, webinar learning experience.

This webinar examines a challenge not often addressed in doing front-line work: dealing with a difficult co-worker. We will offer tips and tools for dealing with common conflict situations that arise with other co-workers. We will also provide a unique strategy for changing how you see conflict situations, how you experience them and the approaches you take to resolve them.

Cross Cultural Awareness​

HSABC’s Trauma in the Homeless Sector webinar offers a compelling look into the science of trauma and how service providers can effectively respond to clients and co-workers that may be affected by trauma.  Participants learn best practices for trauma-informed practices and how they can help individuals affected by trauma.  HSABC’s Trauma in the Homeless Sector webinar provides opportunities for participants to ask questions as well as contribute to surveys and discussions.

Do you feel like you don’t have enough time to accomplish what is important to you? This webinar examines the work-life balance challenges facing many employees and how to recognize signs of burnout.  The intention of this webinar is to offer some practical knowledge, tips and strategies to help front-line workers to feel more empowered to begin to shift the imbalance they may be experiencing.

Instructor

Katherine Aubrey has over 20 years of experience working with people who have faced trauma, addictions, homelessness and/or mental illness. Her varied, front-line work experience ranges from in-reach prison work, group therapy, parole supervision and addictions and mental health counseling. She also has experience working with both victims and perpetrators of violence. Some of her past and current employers include Correctional Service Canada, Long-term Inmates Now in the Community, Aurora Centre/Residential Addictions Treatment for Women, KlaHowEya, Metis Nation and numerous non-profit organizations. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology and Psychology and a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology with specialization in Mental Health Counseling. She also completed a Cross-Cultural Facilitation Skills Intensive for Diversity Trainers in Berkley, California

Webinar- Foundational

This session will present and create a stronger understanding of historical influences that have shaped Indigenous people across this country. It will offer a different worldview that can affect how well programs and services can be designed and delivered to Indigenous clients. It will identify some tools and strategies that a non-Indigenous service provider can use to self-assess their awareness and possible biases that could conflict with Indigenous worldviews and historical experiences. This webinar goes a bit beyond simply telling about Residential Schools, etc., and ideally would be followed up with an in-person skills developing session afterwards.

Instructor

Kevin Barlow is Mi’kmaq from Indian Island First Nation in New Brunswick. He now resides in Vancouver and is Chief Executive Officer of both the Metro Vancouver Aboriginal Executive Council (MVAEC) which is described as a Think and Lead Organization and the newly formed Metro Vancouver Indigenous Services Society (MVISS). MVAEC currently has 23 urban Indigenous member agencies which make up a majority of Indigenous groups serving an estimated 70,000 urban Indigenous population in Metro Vancouver.
Barlow has worked at the local, regional, national and international levels. A large portion of his career has been in the health sector and all of his career has been working for and with Indigenous people. He has also operated his own consulting firm for the last twenty-years supporting the Indigenous non-profit sector to build capacity. He has held over $3M in community-based research grants, delving into areas of residential schooling, sexual violence, HIV and Indigenous women; substance use in the Indigenous community; cultural competency, and more. He has developed policies and strategies in a broad range of areas. For over 16 years Kevin has held senior executive posts, including Chief Administrative Officer in his home community where he reduced the number of people on social assistance from about 40 to 11 in under four years through community economic development. One project he developed was an aquaculture (oyster) farm which now employs 6 full-time seasonal workers and generates over $100K a year for the First Nation.

Webinar- Foundational

In your work, you may have to respond to an overdose to save a life. It is impossible to know how you are going to feel during or after responding to an overdose. Evidence shows that being proactive and having a plan in place improves resiliency and recovery. In this webinar we will review:

  • Different ways human beings can be impacted after responding to an overdose, and
  • Tips and strategies to develop an after-care plan for overdose

The Provincial Overdose Mobile Response Team (MRT) is a free and confidential service for frontline workers and first responders being impacted by the public health opioid emergency in BC. MRT offers psychosocial support in shape of critical incident support and capacity building to support the resiliency and wellness in the work. Psychological First Aid is a simple tool that anyone can use anywhere to help ourselves or others when we have been activated by a stressful or traumatic incident.

Instructor

The Provincial Overdose Mobile Response Team (MRT) offers psycho social support, education, and training to organizations and agencies working within British Columbia’s overdose public health emergency. This includes people impacted by critical incidents such as overdoses and/or deaths during the course of their work. The MRT was created with support from the BC Ministry of Health and BC Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions in recognition of the psycho-social impact of the overdose public health emergency on first responders, front-line workers and people with lived experience/peers.

Pakka Liu is passionate about ending violence against women and all forms of oppression. Having worked frontline in a transition house, a rape crisis centre and women’s centre, the diversity of her experience provides her with an understanding of the challenges that women face and their resistance. Pakka is a strong believer in creating social changes through information, education and collaboration. Pakka is currently the Training Coordinator at the BC Society of Transition Houses (BCSTH) in Vancouver, BC

Webinar- Foundational

The latest research on drug use, the effects on behaviour and skills to help as you support clients with addictions.  This HSABC webinar applies questioning and exploration to understanding, and learning about the physiological effects of certain drugs, including: hallucinogens, depressants, stimulants, anabolic steroids and cannabis.  During this webinar, participants will learn about:

  • What drugs are being used;
  • What someone looks like when they are on different types of drugs;
  • How to assess and manage someone you think is under the influence of drugs; and
  • How to manage a critical emergency.
  • The session will give an overview of harm reduction best practices, the overdose crisis and resources available to workers.
Instructors

Shari McKenzie-Ramsay graduated from UBC as a Registered Nurse in 2015. She works at Lions Gate Hospital as an emergency nurse. Prior to this she was working in Mental Health and Addictions at the Hope Centre (acute psychiatry) and Magnolia House, a mental health transition house. She recently completed a Forensic Nurse Examiner course in Trauma in Health Care through BCIT and is a Take Home Naloxown program educator. Shari is co-owner of Spiritus Wilderness Medical Training, since 2001, and has been teaching injury prevention since 1992. Shari is passionate about trauma informed care in health care and in a community setting.

Peter Ramsay graduated from UBC as a Registered Nurse in 2009. He has dual specialties in emergency nursing and critical care nursing (BCIT – 2010 and 2015 respectively) and is at Lions Gate Hospital, previously in the Emergency Department and the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Now he is the Patient Care Supervisor for the hospital.

Webinar- Foundational

This session will discuss alternative approaches to verbal and physical behaviours that are expressed in an unsafe or aggressive manor in a shelter, outreach and housing setting. Taking a people centred approach, the instructors will discuss how to meet folks where they are at and co-regulating each other to stay connected and prevent further traumatization. To quote Ronnie, one of the instructors, “Kindness is our best option for co-creating safety”.

Instructors

Vikki’s experience includes consulting, training and clinical supervision with refugees and survivors of torture, mental health and substance abuse counsellors, rape crisis counsellors, frontline and housing workers and transgender and queer communities. She has developed curriculum and taught Group Work, Trauma, and Diversity courses at Vancouver Community CollegeAdler University and the University of British Columbia. She received the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Instructor from City University where she has taught for more than ten years. Vikki has presented her work internationally in Australia, New Zealand, Hungary, Britain, Belgium, Sweden and Ireland, working in solidarity with numerous local organizations.

Ronnie is the manager at the Overdose Prevention Society an outdoor safe inhalation site in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. The society provides low-barrier care and harm reduction supplies, with peer staff members working tirelessly to save lives and respond to overdoses during the crisis.

Webinar- Foundational

Everyone should have equitable access to shelter, food and safety when they are in need. However, research shows that for transgender individuals, this is often not the case. Most service providers have not had the opportunity to learn about issues working with transgender individuals accessing their services. Yet these populations are at heightened risk of homelessness, poverty, mental/physical health and/or substance use problems, violence and face additional barriers to accessing services. These sessions, facilitated by Vancouver Coastal Health’s PRISM program, will address ways to make your shelter and housing programs more inclusive and welcoming to transgender individuals. During this training you will explore: definitions and key concepts, social factors for transgender people, unique challenges and barriers to housing, and practical strategies to make your program more inclusive.

Webinar- Foundational

Sadly, the shelter sector is responding to a growing number of seniors that are accessing homeless services. Working with elderly clients in the homeless sector can be challenging due to the complex needs of these vulnerable clients. HSABC’s Working with Elderly Shelter Clients webinar examines health issues and how the effects of aging impact elderly shelter clients. This webinar examines specific areas for front-line, outreach and case planner workers to consider when engaging elderly clients. This interactive webinar introduces techniques that can be helpful when trying to create safe, respectful spaces for elderly clients.

HSABC’s Suicide Risk Factor Checklist webinar discusses how to use the Suicide Risk Factors checklist for providing information to local mental health providers, hospitals, and health authorities. This webinar teaches participants how to transfer pertinent information that mental health workers can use to engage vulnerable and at-risk populations. The Suicide Risk Factor checklist tool is not intended to replace a qualified mental health assessment. Rather, HSABC’s Suicide Risk Factor Checklist webinar is an interactive learning experience that can help participants effectively address risk factors in a supportive environment.

Webinar- Management

Document creation and writing are essential skills used when working with clients that access shelters, outreach teams, case planners and service providers. HSABC’s Effective Document and Report Writing webinar teaches participants the basic techniques and practices of clearly written client and agency documents. Participants will learn the basics of how to create written documents that transfer information effectively to shift supervisors, case managers, and agency, in a fun, interactive and supportive environment.

Webinar- Management

A session for leaders and managers on how emotional intelligence can be one of the greatest factors in leadership success. Knowing yourself well, understanding your team, bringing transparency and speaking truth can bring confidence in you as a leader. Learn about the differences between a manager and a leader, and how to be an inspiration and an influencer.

Instructor

Reid started his career as a certified family therapist and was the Clinical Coordinator of Social Work at Shaughnessy Hospital before moving to the BC Centre of Ability. Reid has provided leadership throughout the sector, most recently as the President of the Health Sciences Association of BC, a union of more than 18,000 health and social services professionals.

HSA is affiliated with the National Union of Public and General Employees. With 340,000 members across the country, it is one of the largest labour organizations in Canada. In the words of NUPGE, “His leadership has transformed HSABC (Health Sciences Association of BC)/NUPGE into a strong voice for health professionals across B.C. and a solid defender of public services, even under enormous pressures.”

Reid earned his Master of Social Work from UBC and continues to provide leadership within his community and businesses.

Webinar- Management

An effective strategic plan will inspire a diverse group of organizational supporters and team members, including funders, volunteers, donors and staff, to drive towards shared outcomes. Confirming a clear purpose, and defining priorities, are critical elements to a robust strategic plan.

This session will introduce a planning framework specific to not-for-profit organizations, and outline steps to building a plan with your team.

  • Evaluate the differences between a strategic plan and an operational plan
  • Outline different types of environmental scans and their role in effective preparation for strategic planning
  • Decribe the five components of a strategic plan for your organization: Vision, mission, success, strategic goals and values
  • Topics
  • Achieving organizational alignment and commitment to shared goals through a strategic plan
Instructor

Mark Friesen is the Director of Capacity Development at Vantage Point, where he assists not-for-profit organizations throughout BC with strategic planning, governance, and capacity building. Mark excels at assessing governance structures and finding democratic solutions to organizational challenges. At Vantage Point, Mark can be found facilitating new and seasoned not-for-profits at various stages in their organizational life cycle. Mark received his Masters’ in Urban Studies at SFU, where he received a Graduate Fellowship in 2012, the Doug Drummond Research Fellowship in 2013, and graduated with the Dean of Graduate Studies Convocation Medal in 2015 for his research into governance at the scale of the city-region. Mark has served as a volunteer, association founder, and an executive director, and has led fundraising, strategic planning and program development efforts in the sector for over 15 years. He currently sits on the Board of the Ripple Coast Society and Columbia College.

Webinar- Management

With the prospect of four plus generations in today’s workforce, never before has managing diverse work styles, preferences and expectations been more challenging. What does it take to secure and inspire talent to get the job done? How do you find that ‘middle ground’ that engages and challenges younger workers without discarding tried and true established ways of doing business? How do you get your less tech-savvy employees to warm to new approaches? This HSABC webinar will take a closer look at generational differences and examine tools and techniques for attracting and keeping the best fit for your organization and for motivating your employees to be present, productive and professional in performing their jobs.

HSABC’s Managing for Improved Performance webinar outlines the steps managers can take to effectively manage staff to improve employee performance. Special sections on absenteeism and problematic employee behaviour are explored with tips on documentation and ways managers can affect positive change in the workplace. HSABC’s Managing for Improved Performance webinar is geared for those in management and supervisory positions and is suitable for both union and non-union employers.

The work force is aging, and at the same time, a younger generation of workers is emerging and redefining the workplace with the advent of technology and tools that promote virtual vs. physical presence. How do you effectively create and manage your organizations needs for regular, scheduled, in-person attendance by your employees? This workshop offers a primer for people managers at all levels complete with policies, programs, tools and techniques, on how to encourage ‘presenteeism’ and how to address fault and no-fault absenteeism should it become problematic for your organization.

Instructor

Marsha Goldford is a chartered professional in Human resources, currently employed with Developmental Disabilities Association (DDA) as their Director of Training and Development. Marsha has a Master’s in Public Administration from Queen’s University, and a Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management from Royal Roads University.

Marsha is also an active community volunteer serving as a director on housing boards and as a mentor with the BC Human Resources Management Association and Dress for Success Professional Women’s Group

Webinar- Management

This 90-minute webinar will provide an introduction to basic management tools and strategies geared toward the unique needs of supervisors, managers, and team leads working in organizations that provide shelter, housing, and other services to people experiencing homelessness. This webinar is aimed at service providers who are new to managing staff, but the information covered is also applicable to people leading volunteers and to more seasoned managers looking to refresh their skills or expand their leadership toolkit. In this webinar, we will explore some common challenges facing new managers, especially in dynamic environments where resources are tight. We will focus on easy-to-implement tools and strategies that managers can employ to ease their own transition into a leadership role and to support their direct reports and their teams to thrive.

Instructor

Since completing her PhD in sociology at UBC, Darcie has worked at the intersection of non-profit management, legal advocacy, and social science research. In 2006, Darcie joined Pivot Legal Society as a community-based researcher and went on to hold several positions including Child Welfare Campaigner, Campaigns Director, and Interim Executive Director. She also spent two years as Director of Marketing and Communications for Ecojustice Canada. In 2018, Darcie completed a graduate certificate in executive coaching from Royal Roads University. Today, as a certified executive coach and consultant, Darcie supports individuals, teams and organizations to live their values sustainably and achieve their goals.

Webinar- Management

This webinar provides an overview of what vicarious trauma is and its impact at an organizational level (e.g. absenteeism, high turnover etc). The session focuses on the prevention and intervention of vicarious trauma in the areas of organizational culture, work load, work environment, education, group support, supervision, and resources for self care. Participants will leave with a tailored practical and implementable strategy to take back to their organization.

Instructor

Amanda specializes in helping individuals and organizations manage workplace stresses and make positive changes.

As a ‘Stress Strategist,’ Amanda works with individuals through the process of inquiry to support people in gaining clarity and finding solutions to challenges. She offers a range of workshops to organizations to facilitate the creation of safe, supportive, and positive work environments.

Having worked for over 15 years in the non-profit world, she has firsthand knowledge of the kinds of experiences that exemplify working in front-line capacities. Her experience includes working in the areas of addiction, victim services, mental health and developmental disabilities.

Although Amanda has a BA in Psychology, a Bachelors of Social Work and a MA in Theology, her greatest accomplishments remain being a loving partner, a devoted mother, and a good friend.

Specialized Courses

For most tenants in BC, money is tight and every dollar matters. Can your landlord charge you for having a pet? What about if you pay your rent late? Do you know about the recent legislative amendment to the annual rent increase formula? This webinar will educate you on the rules regarding deposits, fees and rent increases to ensure that you’re not paying your landlord any more money than you need to.

Want to know more about how residential tenancy dispute resolution works and how to be an effective advocate in the process? Join HSABC for a one-hour, informative webinar learning experience that teaches the skills you will need to present your case more effectively. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Evictions – What you Should Know webinar helps front-line staff, outreach workers and service providers prevent evictions when their clients; repeatedly pay their rent late, have a landlord that is redeveloping a property, or breach the tenancy agreement. This webinar will help participants learn the process for evictions, timelines for dispute resolution, and what can be done to advocate for a client facing an eviction. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

A fixed-term tenancy – often referred to as a “lease” – is a legal contract. How much compensation does a tenant owe their landlord for breaking a lease? Are there times when a tenant is legally allowed to break their lease? What are some alternatives to lease-breaking? This webinar will teach participants the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords when signing fixed-term tenancies, or “leases”. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Bed bugs are everywhere, from the Downtown Eastside, to the West End, and everywhere in between. So how do you avoid bed bugs, spot bed bugs, and treat bed bugs? Can landlords evict tenants for bringing bed bugs into a rental unit? Can tenants end their tenancy if they find bed bugs? These are just some of the complicated questions that this webinar will explore. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Most of BC’s purpose-built rental housing is aging and in need of ongoing maintenance. According to the Residential Tenancy Act, tenants have a right to live in rental housing that is “suitable for occupation”. How do you ask for your landlord to make repairs? What’s the difference between routine maintenance. Learn about the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants in this informative webinar. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Residential Tenancy Law 101 webinar reviews the basic principles of residential tenancy law. This Residential Tenancy Law 101 webinar is a learning opportunity that provides participants with specific information about residential security deposits, lease obligations and condition inspection reports. This webinar’s question and answer period will provide participants with opportunities to ask specific questions about tenancy rights as they pertain to their clients. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

All tenants have a right to quiet enjoyment of their rental housing. This means that they are entitled to reasonable privacy, exclusive use of their unit, and freedom from unreasonable disturbances. This webinar will cover topics such as noise, smoking, disclosure of personal information, and landlord entry.

Do you live in a community with a low vacancy rate? You’re not alone! This webinar provides both practical and legal information on how to find rental housing and safely enter into a tenancy. Topics include budgets, credit checks, references, cover letters, smoking, roommates, pets, discrimination, rental applications, tenancy agreements, condition inspection reports and deposits. Presented in partnership with TRAC.

Instructor

Andrew started at TRAC in 2010, ED of TRAC since 2013, on the Vancouver Renters Advisory Committee and a PovNet board of director and serves on the Residential Tenancy Branch Operational Stakeholders Committee. Has always worked in the non-profit sector. SFU grad with a communication degree.

Specialized Courses

Violence against women and their children by intimate partners is the leading cause of women’s homelessness[i].  Chances are, you’ve already work with women who have experienced abuse or will encounter them in the future.  Safety planning is one of the essential tools that can increase the safety of the survivor and those around them.  This webinar will provide an overview on domestic violence and its impacts.  We will offer tips on how to recognize domestic violence and how to support someone who is experiencing it.  We will also discuss how to safety plan with a woman who is leaving an abusive partner.

Instructor

Pakka Liu is passionate about ending violence against women and all forms of oppression. Having worked frontline in a transition house, a rape crisis centre and women’s centre, the diversity of her experience provides her with an understanding of the challenges that women face and their resistance.  Pakka is a strong believer in creating social changes through information, education and collaboration.  Pakka is currently the Training Coordinator at the BC Society of Transition Houses (BCSTH) in Vancouver, BC.

webinar - Specialized Courses​

According to research, the number of families requiring emergency shelter services in Canada continues to increase. Most shelter systems are not suited to meet the needs of this complex population which causes families to move between cars, campgrounds and friends’ homes. This webinar for front line staff will review recent homelessness trends and discuss best-practices for responding to families experiencing homelessness.

Instructor

Jodi is the Director of Non-Market Operations with the City of Vancouver. She has diverse experience developing, implementing and evaluating homelessness initiatives in the non-profit, government and academic sectors. Prior to coming to the City of Vancouver, Jodi was the Deputy Executive Director of Lookout Emergency Aid Society.

webinar - Specialized Courses​

This webinar will cover the process of helping clients apply for government-issued identification, and strategies for dealing with common obstacles in the application process. Obtaining identification can be densely administrative and complicated, filled with contradictory forms and other barriers. It can be particularly difficult for people experiencing homelessness and other systemic forms of marginalization, many of whom lack any identification whatsoever. Obtaining identification can be an important step in pursuing many routes to housing and stability: opening a bank account, obtaining social assistance, checking into a detox program, or signing a lease, among other things. Drawing on the knowledge used in the ID Clinic operated by UBC Law students and volunteer lawyers in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, this discussion will reflect the lessons learned from the clinic’s first year and a half in operation.

Instructor

Julia has been a clinician with the ID Project since May 2018. She has also helped clients navigate the challenges of identification-related barriers with the general legal clinic at UBC (the Law Students’ Legal Advice Program). A student in her final year at UBC Law, Julia is interested in combating the ways law acts to create homelessness and other forms of marginalization, and in making the legal system more accessible to non-lawyers.

webinar - Specialized Courses​

This HSABC webinar identifies ways to successfully work with landlords to find private market rental housing for hard to house clients.  The webinar includes many real-life examples and strategies to help clients find the right housing. Attendees will learn about:

  • The housing search;
  • Getting viewings;
  • What to take to a viewing;
  • Negotiating leases;
  • Building strong relationships; and
  • Negotiating evictions.
Instructor

Alynn was the Manager for the Homeless Outreach Program at the Progressive Housing Society in Burnaby. Her primary task was to manage the program, the staff and to build community partnerships in order to help clients find and maintain permanent housing. Over the years, Alynn has helped to house hundreds of people coming out of homelessness. She also worked as the supervisor for the Floating Outreach Program at Inn from the Cold in Calgary after finishing her Master’s Degree in Social work.

Currently, Alynn is in Los Angeles, one of the few places in the world with a higher cost of living than Vancouver, where she is the director for LA Family Housing

webinar - Specialized Courses​

This webinar provides up to date information on the human rights of those who are experiencing homelessness, whether in a shelter or in public spaces. With this understanding, participants will be able to identify and combat the stigma of being homeless. This session outlines relevant human rights legislation and policy. It also provides an opportunity to learn about the goals and challenges of human rights within a shelter setting, especially when it comes to gender, family status and disability. An important part of this session is learning about human rights of the homeless when it comes to public spaces. This information will help empower participants to inform their clients, provide public education and advocate for those who are homeless.

Instructor

webinar - Specialized Courses​

Working in a rural setting provides a unique opportunity for community partnership, support and collaboration.  However, it can be challenging with it’s lack of resources, services and potential for burnout.  Dr. Dave Manley works and lives his life in the tiny, isolated community of Consul, in the SW corner of the Province of Saskatchewan.  He will be sharing what it is like to do work and ministry in a rural setting, sharing wisdom and ideas from his neck of the prairies.

This session will explore:

  • The rural mindset;
  • The rural context;
  • Working with the government in a rural setting;
  • Volunteers; and
  • Fundraising.
Instructor

Dave works and lives his life in the tiny, isolated community of Consul, in the SW corner of the Province of Saskatchewan. He likes to tell people that Consul is centrally located; 5 hrs from Calgary, 5 hrs from Saskatoon and 5 hrs from Great Falls, Montana. He is a career pastor, presently serving for the past twenty–two years at the Church of God in Consul. Dave has a number of roles in his community. Volunteer firefighter, ambulance attendant and emergency medical responder, critical incident stress debriefing, board of directors and founder of Living Hope Ranch (helping at risk teenage girls facing life controlling issues). Seven years ago, Dave and his wife Vicki built a bakery in the tiny town, as an experiment in community development. The bakery has since added a restaurant, and today boasts as having the best burgers and cinnamon buns in the world! Dave likes rural life, wood fired pizza, grandchildren and humans!